October 25 - 14:48[October25,2012 Crook:weaverbirdsofAfrica Crooksfindings Group1:forest,insectivorous,solitarynests,etc

October 25 - 14:48[October25,2012 Crook:weaverbirdsofAfrica...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 5 pages.

14:48 [October 25, 2012] - Crook: weaver birds of Africa Crook’s findings Group 1: forest, insectivorous, solitary nests, etc. Group 2: savannah, seed eaters, nest in colonies Food abundance and distribution thought to be the main selective pressure: the “driving  force” – the critical trait drove everything else There’s a temptation to try to predict or conclude which of these characteristics was the  driving force If you are a seed eater, feed in flocks, not too much competition so net in colonies,  polygamous – brightly colored, etc. If insectivorous, not too abundant so solitary,  monogamous because need collaborative effort, etc. All of these factors are correlated.  It’s impossible to state with total confidence that one factor determined these groups.  One problem of comparative approach is that it’s impossible to establish causal chain of  events.  - Jarman – 74 species of African ungulates They vary a lot in characteristics.  Ungulate classes There is a pattern in the table: these different classes reflect different sizes of animal,  from smallest to largest. Associated with difference in habitats. Transition from dense  forest to complete open grassland, what they eat differs. If you are feeding on fruits and  berries, not going to be as abundant as big plain of grass. The larger the group is  associated with great quantities of food.  - Gut size is an important component to the efficient digestion of foliage. Ungulates 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture