constantine - Kiselyuk 1 Constantine was the son of Helena...

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Kiselyuk 1 Constantine was the son of Helena and Flavius Constantinius. Ever since his youth, signs were evident of his future greatness. He was responsible for reuniting a fractured empire. The original story of Constantine’s conversion to Christianity began when he was once marching with his troops and was said to have seen an omen in the sky, in the form of the common day Christian cross. The Edict of Milan, which was passed in 313 granted Christianity the status of a permitted religion. The Edict of Milan neither made paganism illegal nor did it make Christianity a state religion, however it did grant religious freedom. Constantine’s conduct conflicted with Christianity in respects to Diocletian. Since Constantine was primarily raised in Diocletian’s court, he typically followed Diocletian’s rule. However, Christianity demanded the belief in one god, whereas Diocletian was used to worshipping gods that later returned favors and assistance. Therefore, one would assume that Constantine would follow in Diocletian’s beliefs of the religion. When Diocletian stepped down and gave his position to Galerius, Constantine
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constantine - Kiselyuk 1 Constantine was the son of Helena...

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