Term Paper

Term Paper - 2007 CORE 179: Tibet Carly Weil [ THE EFFECTS...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 2007 CORE 179: Tibet Carly Weil [ THE EFFECTS OF THE WESTERN WORLD ON TIBETAN BUDDHISM ] The world is an ever shrinking place. What once was a vast space of unknown territory can now be completely traversed in a matter of days. People on opposite ends of the globe, thanks to the creation and popularity of the internet, are able to interact with ease. With this has come a strong exchange of ideas and cultures. The Western and Eastern worlds are now readily accessible to anyone and are becoming increasingly more entwined. This mutual relationship is seen vividly in the case of Tibetan Buddhism. Not only has Tibetan Buddhism found a home in the Western world, but it has witnessed large scale changes within itself. The Tibetans have embraced these drastic changes, reevaluating and transforming their traditional ways of life. Such cultural reform has been largely led by His Holiness the Dalai Lama, through his progressive and liberal attitude and his passion for Western science. Looking at the effects these new outlooks have had on the Tibetan people, it is apparent that Buddhists have been changed for the better and that Buddhism has, in turn, positively influenced the Western world. From the Western perspective, it is very clear to what extent this inter-global exchange has occurred when one looks at the surge of interest in Tibetan Buddhism. There have been myriad books written about Tibetan Buddhism, ranging from simple analytical and factual books to books intending to package Buddhism up in a form easily consumable by the Western public. Monasteries, like the Namgyal Monastery in Ithaca, New York, have established themselves and gained many Western supporters. Even the existence of our Tibet class in a highly respected university is evidence of this growing phenomenon. The start of the Buddhist movement in the West is usually credited to the 1893 World Parliament of Religions at the Worlds Fair, where for the first time Westerners were openly exposed to Buddhism by an actual Buddhist rather than by word of mouth. 1 With the rise of interest in so called occult religions and cultures, combined with the shroud mystery around the land of Tibet, a surge in the Buddhist movement was seen. It has been steadily growing ever since, welcoming more and more supporters each year. 2 Increasingly so, Buddhist monks have made a home in the West. This has much to do with the large numbers of monks forced to flee Tibet after the Chinese invasion of the 1950s. Fearing for the future of their religion, they began teaching Westerners the scriptures of Buddha. 3 Monasteries and Buddhist communities, such as Namgyal Monastery, arose. Yet these monks were received by a different audience than they were used to. Even the monks themselves were usually of a more liberal nature, as the more traditional monks tended to remain in India or Tibet....
View Full Document

Page1 / 19

Term Paper - 2007 CORE 179: Tibet Carly Weil [ THE EFFECTS...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online