Notes - Architectural History Professor Francesco...

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Architectural History Professor Francesco Cappellari Office: ARC 450 Architecture Building Office Hours: Tuesday, immediately after class Friday: Period 5 (by appointment) Email: via WebCT Only GTA: Tahir Edwards (tahir@ufl.edu) Class Schedule: Tuesday Periods 5-6 Thursday Period 6 Class Location: Carleton Auditorium Required Text: Title: Buildings Across Time: An Introduction to World Architecture Author: Moffett, Fazio, Wodehouse Publisher: McGraw-Hill Professional Books Note: Gordon Rule Credit (Section – 0359) choose topic by 9/11
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08-23-2007 Utilitas - Commodity Firmitas - Firmness Veunstas - Delight From: Vitruvius “De Architectura” (translated: “The Ten Books of Architecture”)
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08-28-2007 Prehistoric Settlements Ancient Mesopotamia Prehistory and the First Architecture: Humanity’s earliest organization was the family and the extended family, or the tribe. The prehistory to architecture started with the development of organized familial tribes because a family unit was just large enough to provide mutual sustenance at the hunting and gathering level of human civilization. Housing was only temporary because the tribe had to move with the migration of the animals. Two of the earliest known urban communities are Jericho, Israel (ca. 8000 BCE) and Catal Huyuk, Anatolia (6500-5700 BCE) (Present Day Turkey) One of the earliest permanent communities Mud brick walls with post and lintel timber construction of roofs Access to living units from roof to provide defense No streets in the community. The Plan of Catal Huyuk has the buildings abutted to one another forming a continuous grouping of buildings with random breaks for open courtyards. The buildings were each a mixture of houses, workshops, and shrines. The windowless shrines were interspersed within the community and contained decorative motifs of bulls and cult statuettes of deities, which indicated the still existent themes of cave-art within Catal Huyuk.
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Western Europe Megalithic (Great Stone) Construction Used for ceremonial/religious purposes as well as astronomical calendars to coordinate agricultural activities. The significant architectural successes of Western Europe were megalith constructions, composed of large stones and boulders and constructed for astronomical reasons or religious/ceremonial purposes. Examples: Entranceway, Newgrange Passage Grave, Ireland ca. 3100 BCE Built upon the crest of a hill. It is a massive mound of earth with decorated boulders surrounding the perimeter. 300’ diameter and 36’ high The structure is designed around the five days of winter solstice so that the sun penetrates into the deepest chamber of the cavity. (The light from the sun illuminates through the doorway along a passage to the main chamber. Stonehenge, Salisbury Plain, England, ca. 2900-1400 BCE
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Notes - Architectural History Professor Francesco...

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