2nd bob response

2nd bob response - power positions, who can then...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
In my previous response to Bob, I argued that honesty in a monogamous relationship could effectively neutralize the risk of HIV/AIDS. In a perfect world where gender equality and modern medicine were a given for the entirety of the world’s population, such a line of reasoning would hold up. For many people in developing countries, however, the absence of these necessities makes abstinence and protected sex the only realistic alternatives for survival. In many developing countries, an inherent lack of gender equality, especially in sexual relations, greatly increases the risk of the spread of HIV. Many women are forced to trade sex for basic necessities such as shelter and food. Young girls are even made to have sex with men in exchange for uniforms required to attend school. Given that men often seek multiple sexual partners, the risk of HIV contraction is high for men in sexual
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: power positions, who can then unknowingly pass the disease on to the women that depend on them. Additionally, limited access to essential medical supplies hinders many developing countries in their efforts to diagnose and prevent HIV. Both HIV testing kits and antiretrovirals like AZT are in short supply in such countries, making the effort to contain and identify the epidemic nearly impossible. All of these factors combined create a situation in which women are subjected by a societal system of gender inequality to sex with men who are at high risk for HIV. Even if the infection is later identified, the lack of supply of vital treatments makes survival a daunting task. Something must be done, or else women will continue to die for seeking basic essentials....
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online