skepticismstoicism

skepticismstoicism - Kevin Pintauro The Better Life of a...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Kevin Pintauro The Better Life of a Skeptic October 9, 2006
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Abstract Page Skepticism is appeals to me much more than stoicism because I believe that our lives should be valued and one should respectably fear death. It is a natural instinct to fear the unknown and especially death. To not fear death is to not embrace life. A life without fear takes away one’s humanity and having fears is what part of what makes one human. I think that life has more of a purpose when everything is questioned and nothing is absolute. Should this life be completely irrelevant in death, I would still have rather have lived it with a sense of purpose and a pursuit of happiness than be indifferent to whatever happens to me.
Background image of page 2
Stoicism and Skepticism are two opposite philosophies that are ways of viewing and living one’s life. Stoicism is a belief in which one should live their life with no expectations or hope and be completely indifferent. An ancient philosopher, Seneca, once said, “That which Fortune has not given, she cannot take away.” If one does not place value on something, then they will not care if it is lost. If one has no hope or expectations, than one can never be disappointed. Seneca preaches this life of indifference, in his book, Letters from a Stoic . He says that one can only achieve a clear and unbiased mind with absence of emotion. This is the main idea of Stoicism. Stoics also exclude from their lives pleasures of flesh and believe sex only to be a means of reproduction. The stoic is not afraid of death and further believes that it is unwise to be so because death is unknown, and one has no reason to fear what they don’t know. Skepticism is a life of openness and question. It is a subjective way of viewing life and its contents. In David Hume’s essay, “The Sceptic”, he says, “…qualities are not really in the objects, but belong entirely to the sentiment of that mind which blames or praises.” In other words, beauty (virtue or any quality) is in the eye of the beholder. Skepticism
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PHL 107 taught by Professor White during the Spring '07 term at Creighton.

Page1 / 6

skepticismstoicism - Kevin Pintauro The Better Life of a...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online