Piety - morally good such as bravery and concern for...

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Kevin Pintauro August 27, 2006 Definitions of Piety/Socrates Objections 1. Euthyphro’s first definition is his prosecuting of his father for murder. Socrates’ first objection is that it’s only an example or instance of piety and not a definition. 2. Euthyphro's second definition is piety is what the gods approve of. Socrates criticizes it because the gods disagree amongst themselves as to what meets their approval. 3. Euthyphro’s third overcomes definition is: What all the gods approve of is holy or pious, and what they all disapprove of is unholy or impious. Socrates then asks do the gods approve an action because it is holy, or is it holy because it is approved. Socrates argues that the unanimous approval of the gods is merely an aspect of piety and not part of its defining characteristics. 4. Euthyphro’s fourth definition is: Piety belongs to those actions we call just or morally good. However, there are more than just pious actions that we call just or
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Unformatted text preview: morally good such as bravery and concern for others. Socrates then asks what is that makes piety different from all those other actions that we call just? 5. Euthyphro then suggests that piety is concerned with looking after the gods. Socrates objects saying, “If 'looking after' is used in its ordinary sense, which Euthyphro agrees it is, this would imply that when you perform a pious action you make one of the gods better, which is hubris and gods frown upon it. 6. Euthyphro then proposes his final definition as a sort of sacrifice and prayer. He puts forward the notion of piety is a way of being in good favor with the gods. Socrates asks Euthyphro to state what benefit the gods receive from the gifts humans give to them. Euthyphro replies that they are not that sort of gift at all, but rather honor, esteem and gratitude....
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PHL 107 taught by Professor White during the Spring '07 term at Creighton.

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