Sleep Deprivation

Sleep Deprivation -...

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39290d503def300c7f6a902cfaa6c4918ea20684.doc - 1 - Running Head: SLEEP DEPRIVATION Sleep Deprivation: Understanding the Cause and Effects of Sleep Deprivation for Teenagers Kevin Pintauro Creighton University
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39290d503def300c7f6a902cfaa6c4918ea20684.doc - 2 - One of the most important necessities in life besides food, water and oxygen, is the ability to regenerate the body through sleep. In today’s world, life is very demanding, and the body thus requires more sleep to compensate. However, after my research of this topic, it appears that sleep is taking a backseat to high work demand, and this bad habit is sending the wrong message to teenagers and young adults. Teenagers and young adults, are who are still physically developing, are not getting the recommended amount of sleep. While a full of night sleep for adults is considered to be seven to eight hours, teens are recommended to get nine to ten hours of sleep per night. The biology of teenagers is different from adults because teenage minds and bodies are still developing. Not only do teens need more sleep than adults, their bodies naturally feel the ability to be active longer (once awake) and in to the night; this is why many teens complain about not being tired when they try to go to sleep. This higher demand and lower supply of sleep hours can present many psychological problems to a teen’s everyday life and can have negative effects on teen health. A recent article written by Emily Sohn (2006), talks about the effects that a lack of sleep can have on teens and how their school work is affected by it. Sleep allows the body to recover from daily physical stresses that one puts on (Sohn, 2006). In these stressful and demanding times, sleep should be even more important to people, but is undoubtedly a regularly expendable part of many people’s lives, including teenagers’. Schools today are forcing teens and young adults to wake up very early, often before dawn, to eat breakfast and catch the bus; with some schools having their first class at 7:00am. These demands do not coincide with teenagers’ evolutionary body clock. A possible reason for this tendency that teens have for being able to stay up later may be
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39290d503def300c7f6a902cfaa6c4918ea20684.doc - 3 - because teens could have been responsible for protecting their tribes at night (Carskadon, 1998). Having teenagers wake up so early is unnatural and goes against their biology. And if there is one thing that has been learned from nature, it is that one cannot fight their biology; and that is what the evidence suggests. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (2001),
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PSY 111 taught by Professor Buddesheim during the Spring '08 term at Creighton.

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Sleep Deprivation -...

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