Venturesome Capital- State Charter School Finance Systems

Charter schools should receive funds for qualifying

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Unformatted text preview: grants and revenue on the same basis as any other school. Programs include professional development ($30 to $50 per pupil) and media centers ($135 to $150 per pupil). Transportation: To the extent feasible, school districts are obligated to provide charter school transportation. In the estimate in the accompanying table, the school district is assumed to spend its average per-pupil transportation revenue on the charter students. State Start-Up Assistance: None available. Capital Outlay and Facilities Funding: Charter schools are not guaranteed a separate flow of capital funding. School districts are, however, obligated to share capital funding when possible. Given that almost all charter schools use preexisting school district buildings, facilities have not been a major issue. Timing of Payments: Charter schools receive funding on the same schedule as other schools in their district. Uniform Financial Reporting: Not required. Financial reporting requirements are determined in the charter agreement. Auditing Practice: Blended with school district, although a charter agreement could contain a provision for an independent financial audit. Responsibility for Debt: In practice, school districts are assumed to be responsible for debt, although this issue is not addressed specifically in the law. Ownership and Disposition of Assets: Not specifically addressed in law or regulation. In the event of a charter school failure, it is assumed that assets revert back to the district. Unexpended Funds: Charter schools can carry fund balances from year to year if the school district chooses to allocate funds in this manner. Teacher Retirement: All charter schools currently participate in the state teacher retirement system, but participation is not mandatory. Charter school teachers employed by a local school board are eligible. Charter schools contracted to private management will probably be allowed to opt out. 128 Appendix Georgia Basic Elementary Charter School FTE $/Member Georgia Total FTE enrollment 100 Middle Cost K-12 Charter School FTE $/Member 100 Urban At-Risk Upper Grade FTE $/Member 100 a 1. Formula funding Grades 1-3 Grades 4-5 Grades 6-8 Grades 9-12 Special education level 1 Special education level 2 Special education level 3 Remedial Gifted 2. Categorical funding Middle school Special assistance Media center 60 40 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 19 13 19 25 1 3 5 9 6 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 733 380 574 749 80 288 627 373 314 0 0 0 52 2 6 10 30 0 $ $ $ $ 2,950 $ 303 $ 1,092 $ 2,377 $ 2,110 $ - 95 $ $ $ 64 153 95 $ $ $ 98 $ 27 $ 25 $ $ 68 $ 8 $ `187 $ $ $ $ $ $ 27 25 5 68 8 167 $ $ $ $ $ $ 26 21 22 9 54 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 135 39 1 52 $ $ $ $ 270 2 78 52 b $ $ $ Staff development In-school suspension Limited-English proficiency Grade 4-5 counselors Technology training 3. Transportation 4. Federal funding Title I Special education Bilingual and immigrant Other federal programs Total revenue $ 2,315 $ 1,168 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ - 100 52 $ 3,925 100 $ 4,957 100 $ 9,464 ASSUMPTIONS: Ba...
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This note was uploaded on 02/11/2013 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '09 term at Harvard.

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