Venturesome Capital- State Charter School Finance Systems

The contractor that manages the fund requires

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Unformatted text preview: ms Capital Outlay and Facilities Financing: Use of pre-existing public school facilities may be negotiated with the local school board. Only five schools were using such facilities in 1998-99. Federal Funds: Charter schools are not school districts for purposes of federal funding, but the state works to ensure that charter schools receive their share of federal funding through school districts. Timing of Payments: Charter schools receive their enrollment-based funds in July, with a projection governing the precise amount paid. In the subsequent winter, funding is adjusted based on actual pupil counts. Uniform Financial Reporting: Charter schools need to complete the standard annual financial report (AFR). Even district-authorized charter schools file a separate AFR, a practice put into place by the state department of education. Independent Financial Audit: The state department of education audits district-sponsored charter schools as an entity of the school district. An annual independent financial audit is required of state-authorized charter schools. Responsibility for Debt: The law is silent on this issue. Ownership and Disposition of Assets: The charter document makes provisions for the disposition of assets. For state-authorized charter schools, assets purchased with state funds revert to the state. Unexpended Funds: State-authorized charter schools are able to build fund balances. Unexpended funds in the other types of charter schools revert to the district unless an exception is made in the charter. Teacher Retirement: Employees on leave from school districts must be allowed to maintain their status in their retirement system. Otherwise, charter schools can provide another retirement option. Only one charter school has exercised the alternative retirement option. 142 Appendix Louisiana Cost Basic Elementary Charter School Factor Weight FTE WFTE Louisiana Middle Cost K-12 Charter School FTE WFTE Urban At-Risk Upper Grade FTE WFTE Weighted FTE calculations Basic K-12 a 1.00 c Small district weight Total weighted FTE 100.0 100 100.0 100 100.0 0 0.0 11 16.5 22 33.0 0.17 0.60 na Special education At-risk Gifted and talented 100 1.50 b 44 0 0 7.5 0.0 0.0 52 3 0 8.8 1.8 0.0 78 0 0 13.3 0.0 0.0 107.5 Total FTE enrollment 1. Base funding 3. At-risk 100 d 2. Special education 127.1 146.3 100 100 $ 4,527 e $ 4,422 - $ - $ - $ e $ 4,527 $ e - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - e $ - $ - $ - e 4. Limited-English proficient 5. Other state categorical 6. Student transportation 7. Federal funding Title I Special education Bilingual and immigrant Other federal programs $ - $ - $ - $ $ $ $ 238 74 $ $ $ $ 238 45 3 74 $ $ $ $ 476 90 6 74 Total revenue $ 4,839 $ 4,887 $ 5,068 ASSUMPTIONS: Each school has 100 students. Basic elementary charter school enrolls 44 at-risk students (mandated minimum of 85 percent of district average) but no other students with special needs. Middle cost K12 charter school has the same student population characteristics as the average Louisiana district. The basic and average schools rely on 1997-98 revenue estimates for Red River Parish (increased by an estimated 3 percent to reflect 1998-99 revenue). At-risk upper grade charter school has twice the concentration of specia...
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This note was uploaded on 02/11/2013 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '09 term at Harvard.

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