Innovation in Education Markets- Theory and Evidence on the Impact of Competition and Choice in Char

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Innovation in Education Markets: Theory and Evidence on the Impact of Competition andChoice in Charter SchoolsAuthor(s): Christopher LubienskiReviewed work(s):Source:American Educational Research Journal,Vol. 40, No. 2 (Summer, 2003), pp. 395-443Published by:American Educational Research AssociationStable URL:.Accessed: 07/11/2012 16:00Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at..JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected].American Educational Research Associationis collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extendaccess toAmerican Educational Research Journal.
American Educational Research JournalSummer 2003, Vol. 40, No.2, pp.395-443Innovation in Education Markets:Theoryand Evidence on theImpactofCompetitionand Choice in Charter SchoolsChristopherLubienskiIowa StateUniversityCharterschools elevate choice andcompetitiontofostereducational innova-tions.Indeed,thesemarket-stylemechanisms are intended tochallengestandardizedpracticesassociated with district administrationofschools.However,acomprehensivereviewof practicesin charter schools indicatesthat, althoughsomeorganizationalinnovations areevident,classroom strate-giestend toward thefamiliar. Drawingonorganizationaland economictheory,this article considersthe forces shapingeducational innovation inmarket-orientedreforms. Although reformersassume thatcompetitionandchoicenecessarilylead to innovations withinschools,a morecomplexexam-inationof competitiveinstitutional environmentssuggeststhat mechanismsemployed by reformers may actuallyundercut their intendedpurposes.Thediscussionhighlightsthepotential forchoice andcompetitionto constrainopportunities foreducational innovation and toimpose pedagogicalandcurricularconformity.KEYWORDs:charterschools, competition,educationpolicy,school choice."It'sjustlikePepsi-Cola!"--GeorgianpresidentEduardShevardnadze,aftersamplingCoca-Colaat theopeningof a new Cokebottling plantin TiblisiFewideas are morecloselyassociated with charter schools than the notionof innovation. Much of thethinkingon school choiceproceedsfrom thepremisethat state-administered schools arenecessarilyboundbybureau-CHRISTOPHERLUBIENSKIis an Assistant Professorof Historical andComparativeStudiesin EducationatIowa StateUniversity,E155ALagomarcinoHall, Ames,IA50011;e-mail [email protected] He is also a Fellow at BrownUniversity'sAdvanced StudiesFellowship Program.

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Term
Fall
Professor
SMITH
Tags
Economics, Public School, charter schools, Charter school

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