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historyreview - The Gilded Age Building Modern Society...

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The Gilded Age: Building Modern Society Exam #1 Review Reconstruction, 1865-1877: Thirteen, Fourteenth, Fifteenth Amendments 13 th -(1865) abolished slavery and gave Congress power to enforce by “appropriate legislation” -Many petitions including a large one by the Women’s Loyalty National League got the 13 th amendment passed 14 th - (1868) citizenship to freedmen -ex-confederates banned from political offices unless congress gives 2/3 favorable vote -declared confederate debt null and void 15 th - (1870) right to vote despite race, color, or previous condition of servitude -many Northerners considered reconstruction over at this point Freedmen’s Bureau 1865- helped freedmen adjust to free life Supplied food and medical services Build thousands of schools and a few colleges Negotiated employment contracts Managed confiscated land Johnson’s Reconstruction Policy -all southerners take an oath of loyalty -new state constitutions: Must abolish slavery Must refuse confederacy -let the states decide what to do with freedmen -send representatives to congress -some people could not participate: Wealthy plantation owners High ranking confederate officers Military academy grads from the south Black Codes 1865- major restrictions for freedmen: Curfews Needed passes if they were out Had to live in towns not off in the woods (to prevent conspiring) State supported schools and orphanages excluded blacks Congressional Reconstruction 1866- was not much unity among congressmen can be summed up by the 14 th amendment which defines citizenship Civil and political equality for freedmen Civil Rights Act 1866- ended restrictions on freedmen Was vetoed by Johnson but Congress over rode the veto
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Radical Republicans -wanted to democratize the South -civil and political equality for freedmen -endorsed public education -redistribution of plantation lands Ku Klux Klan 1865- “Kuklos” meaning circle or brotherhood -started in Pulaski Tennessee - was created for white men to come together and talk about their problems after slaves were freed 1867- KKK became violent Targeted: -republicans -carpet baggers -scalawags -freedmen American Indians and the Development of the West, 1877-1900 Humanitarian Reformers -Easterners who wanted to help solve the Indian problem -Wanted to educate and assimilate Indians Exclusionists -Westerners who wanted to solve the Indian problem -Wanted all of the Indians out of there way Peace Policy 1869 – Reservation system (died in 1877) -provided with food, clothing and housing -missionaries would educate and assimilate them Government did not provide enough resources for the program to work Reservations -provided with food, clothing and housing -missionaries would educate and assimilate them Government did not provide enough resources for the program to work Dawes Severalty Act 1877-1934 -Created to break up reservations -reservations divided into individual allotments for 160 acres -Land was to be given to Indian (heads of household) -gov’t only considered men to be heads of household
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Meyer during the Spring '08 term at Ramapo.

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historyreview - The Gilded Age Building Modern Society...

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