Hobbes - Stephen Meehan Political Theory; Professor Roos...

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Stephen Meehan Political Theory; Professor Roos Jeremy Rabideau February 9, 2007 Hobbes and the Leviathan Upon meeting the girl we are immediately in “meer Nature.” From the outset there is no common power to which we both belong or of which we are both afraid, therefore we are in “meer Nature” or a state of “warre,” since Hobbes states that, “during the time men live without a common Power to them all in awe, they are in that condition which is called Warre,” (41-1). Even after this girl and I make promises to one another to keep the food that we now have, we still have not entered into a political society, since there is no “common Power” over both of us to ensure the enforcement of these promises. This “common Power” is necessary for the establishment of political society. I enter the state of war with her the moment I see her looking at my food, because I then have reason
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Hobbes - Stephen Meehan Political Theory; Professor Roos...

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