Sense - Stephen Meehan April 9, 2008 Philosophy 30303;...

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Stephen Meehan May 7, 2009 Philosophy 30303; Prof. K. Ameriks Short Paper 2: Hegel, The Phenomenology of Spirit, Consciousness: Sense-Certainty and Perception Hegel uses the idea of “determinate negation” as a way of defining, or better, limiting ideas. In The Phenomenology of Spirit , Hegel explains what things are most easily through their antithesis, or by elaborating on what they are not. This method of defining things, and building up from it is Hegel’s way of escaping the void of total skepticism that he believes would lead to “nothing.” Determinate negation, unlike skepticism, apprehends a new form, on which knowledge can build, ideally toward the point where only knowledge is needed to know the object. In his section on Sense-Certainty , Hegel uses this process to discern the reliability, truth or “certainty” of the senses in “knowing” what is. Initially we assume that we have total knowledge of an object because of the sensual presentation before us. However, Hegel uses determinate negation to show that this is not knowledge.
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PHIL 30303 taught by Professor Ameriks during the Spring '08 term at Notre Dame.

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Sense - Stephen Meehan April 9, 2008 Philosophy 30303;...

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