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Developmental Milestones Oral Language Development for Children from Birth to Pre-K Dawn Rathburn ECS 425 November 7, 2020 Mrs. Stella Romano
Oral Language Development Oral language is the system through which we use spoken words to express knowledge, ideas, and feelings. Developing oral language, means developing the skills and knowledge that go into listening and speaking—all of which have a strong relationship to reading comprehension and to writing. (Hougen & Smarrt,2012)
Speech Suggestions for Children with Little to no Language Provide Choices instead of asking open-ended questions. (i.e., “What do you want?”) “Do you want _____ or _____?” Do Not Anticipate Needs and Desires. Encourage him/her to use communication (eye gaze, vocalization, pointing, etc.) to communicate what he/she wants, even when you know what he/she is likely to request. Look for some indication as to which item the child wants (eye gaze, reaching, pointing, vocalizing, etc.) Then model the name of the item (single word or short phrase) as you give it to the child. “Juice, you want juice!” Model Language in short phrases of 1 to 3 words. By modeling language, you are increasing the child’s exposure to language in the world around him/her. Describe what the child is doing and what you are doing. Use both action words and object labels. “Push!” or “Push the car,” or “Baby” or “Baby’s sleeping.” Respond to and praise the child’s vocalizations. Do not imitate the child’s baby talk, but rather model the adult form of the word with emphasis on the target sound/word. If the child says, “wa-wa” when requesting a drink of water, you can say “Water, you want water.”
Strategies For Parents Talk to your child frequently. During mealtime, bath time, diaper changing,

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