Anna Karenina First Paper - The Blizzard Inside Often in contemporary literature storms hold immense symbolism as signs of inner turmoil chaos in the

Anna Karenina First Paper - The Blizzard Inside Often in...

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The Blizzard Inside Often in contemporary literature, storms hold immense symbolism as signs of inner turmoil, chaos in the world of the story, or any of a dozen other things. Leo Tolstoy’s “Anna Karenina” is no exception to this trend even though it was written long before many of the stories that utilize this comparison today. The blizzard Tolstoy employs near the end of part one of his eight-part saga is meant to mirror both the inner turmoil felt by Anna Karenina and the newly-chaotic state of relations between Vronsky and Kitty, and Anna and Vronsky to name a few. Though both hail from St. Petersburg, there is little connection between Vronsky and Anna Karenina before their fateful meeting in the Moscow train station. At first glance, he is struck by “her shining grey eyes, which seemed dark because of their thick lashes” (61). She echoes his glance as Tolstoy describes how “a surplus of something so overflowed her being that it expressed itself (…) now in the brightness of her glance, now in her smile” (61). The two, at

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