Tigard - A Geography of Home The Portland Metro Area...

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A Geography of Home: The Portland Metro Area Submitted by Cortney Cline Geography 100 Professor Brown December 8th, 2005
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When Portland was chosen as the millennium’s “Most Livable City,” Money magazine said “Portlanders are deeply passionate about their city…There’s plenty to be proud of, especially the city’s successful transformation from old timber town to high- tech hub…[It’s now] a mini-metropolis…renowned for java joints, brewpubs, and bookstores. A superb light rail network and a new streetcar system are helping to make it a cinch to get around. It’s a stellar location” (Lansing, 466). Tigard is centrally situated between I-5 and 99W, at the base of Highway 217. Only 11 miles away from the metropolitan hub of Portland, Tigard is located in Washington County, Oregon in the core country of the United States (see Map 1). Near the center of the town, City Hall sits at 45°25’40” N, 122°46’44” W, and 166 feet above sea level. The incorporated land area (see Map 2) is approximately eleven square miles and is home to 44,070 residents. On average, Tigard is 162 feet above sea level. The highest elevation is at the summit of Bull Mountain at 713 feet above sea level and the lowest is on the riverfront of Cook Park at a mere 104 feet above sea level. The Tualatin River, which is a part of the Willamette River Watershed, borders Tigard to the south. The city boasts twelve public parks including developed picnic areas and sports fields as well as natural wetlands, meadows, and forests. The majority of the area is residential as compared to neighboring Portland which is a central hub for industry. About a two hour drive from the Pacific Ocean, Tigard has a very mild climate and is typically quite pleasant in terms of weather. It has quickly become an integral part of a flourishing metropolis.
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Wilson and Polly Tigard came over the Oregon Trail in 1852 to claim their 320 acres near what is now Bull Mountain. The area was originally known as East Butte, but the family changed it to Tigardville in 1886 after the meeting hall was set up. As the first settlers of the area, they established their own log home and a general store, which soon evolved into a post office, voting place, and a home for the one and only telephone in the area. As other settlers continued to arrive, development of the area continued, though much of it remained farmland. Virtually all of Tigardville was part of the primary sector with the exception of the general store. Selling produce was not so simple because transportation was difficult. It was not until Canyon Road was constructed in the late 1800s that fresh produce could be shipped to Portland from the surrounding Tualatin Valley. This road gave both Portland and its outlying areas an advantage over other settlements forming further down the Willamette River. It was easier for west side farmers to bring produce to Portland than it was to transport goods from the east side, so Portland invested in the farmers of Tigard, Beaverton, and Tualatin (Maddux, 19). Activity in the Port of Portland increased thanks to the growing number of exports and in
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Tigard - A Geography of Home The Portland Metro Area...

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