Journal #2 - Since collisions of real gases are...

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Christine Kositz Journal #2 The Ideal Gas Law is an equation that combines Boyle’s law, Avogadro’s law, and Charles’ law into one equation: PV = nRT, where P is the pressure of a gas, V is the volume of the gas, n is the number of moles, R is the molar gas constant, which is 0.0821L*atm/K*mol, and T is the temperature in degrees Kelvin. This equation is useful for low to moderate pressures and for temperatures that are not too low. Ideal gases are gases exhibit the following properties. The ideal gas particles are so small that the mass is considered to be zero. Real gases do have volume. Ideal gas collisions are elastic, meaning they do not lose energy when they collide. Real gas collisions are non-elastic. Real gases deviate from the ideal gas law at high pressures and low temperatures. The Van der Waals equation accounts for deviations from ideal behavior.
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Unformatted text preview: Since collisions of real gases are non-elastic, the term n 2 a/V 2 is correcting for the interactions of these particles. The value of a is a constant, and must be experimentally determined for each gas. Since real gas particles have real volume, the nb term is correcting for the excluded volume. The value of b is constant, and must be experimentally determined for each gas. These constants can be found in CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics in a table. Ideal gases are simpler and use the Ideal gas law at low to moderate pressures and temperatures that arent too low. Real gases deviate from the ideal gas law at high temperatures and low temperatures, and the Van der Waals equation can be used to account for the volume and pressure change....
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course CHEM 111 taught by Professor Sherer during the Spring '08 term at Anne Arundel CC.

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