EDT-FPX5100A_SandiferKhadijah_Assessment1-1.docx - Application of Theory to Leading Innovation and Implementing Change Khadijah Sandifer Capella 2020

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Application of Theory to Leading Innovation and Implementing Change Khadijah Sandifer Capella 2020 EDT-FPX5100A Jay Hollinger 07 15, 2020
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Preparing Future Teacher Leaders Lynne Schrum & Barbara B. Levin There are many ways that teachers and leaders can work together to bring about school improvement and student achievement using technology as a key leverage point. Teachers that are chosen to lead this type of change should be well prepared during preparation programs they take on the role of becoming a teacher leader. It is arguable that teachers must finish preparation programs at a level ready to take on leadership roles in order to participate fully in technology- rich schools. New teachers may begin their teaching careers in a school or system that has not used technology effectively to transform practice, make use of data, or implement best practices (Schrum & Levin, p. 97). Spillane, Halverson, and Diamond (2001) suggested that to understand leadership, it is important to look beyond what one person can do, or know how to do, but look instead at what each person brings to the task, build on strengths, and collaboratively tackle issues. School leadership is “understood as distributed practice, stretched over the school’s social and situational contexts” (p. 23). In order for change to take place within any system, especially a school system, the different working components must all come together in order for this change to take place and to take place successfully and smoothly. All components must work together when making changes if they are to be sustained and embraced by all (Adamy & Heinecke, 2005; Kopcha, 2010; Senge et al., 2001). Being a teacher leader usually refers to a set of skills demonstrated by educators who continue to teach students but who also at the same time have an influence that extends beyond their own classrooms to others within their own school and elsewhere. When we think about leadership, we often default to a principal or superintendent, but lately, the notion of “teacher leaders” has become much more important (Crowther, 2009; 2
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Meyers & Rust, 2003). A typical definition of leadership can also describe exemplary teachers: “a person who guides or directs a group; the ability to lead” (Dictionary.com). The most common example of leadership is the hierarchy system within the school. The principal being at the top and the key to making the school and being the best that it can be within the community. When faculty is led by a strong principal that is supportive it allows for that faculty team to succeed no matter how challenging things may be. A focus on a collaborative environment appears to be essential for all leadership (Crum & Sherman, 2008; Marzano, Waters, & McNulty, 2005) and is even more important for leading 21 st century schools. Different responsibilities must be given to teachers who are seen fit and responsible to handle this type of work and commitment all while allowing them to work within teams and have a great team collaboration throughout the school building.
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