2-14 Romanticism, Liberalism, Socialism - Romanticism Liberalism and Socialism 1 RomanticismPoets glorify nature genius and imagination celebrates

2-14 Romanticism, Liberalism, Socialism - Romanticism...

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Romanticism, Liberalism, and Socialism 1. Romanticism—Poets: glorify nature, genius and imagination; celebrates emotion a. Chateaubriand a.i. Wrote the Genius of Christianity b. Lord Byron (1788-1824) b.i. British—Emerges as the quintessential romantic of the age b.ii. Caught up in emotion—sexual affairs with both genders c. William Wordsworth (1770-1850) c.i. Captures the desire of many romantics and elevates nature…almost to the supernatural c.ii. Makes nature filled with human emotions d. Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) d.i. The lyrical ballads—call on poets to abandon rules about classical style and to instead express their emotion e. Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) e.i. German –most famous of German authors e.ii. Not really romantic, but crosses in and out of it e.iii. Faust—one individual makes a deal with the devil in return for a chance to taste all human experience 2. Romanticism—Painters a. Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) a.i. Romantic painter—lone individual in nature; completely alone…nature is dismal a.ii. Sublime power of nature – Damn nature! You scary! b. M.W. Turner (1775-1851) b.i. Seascapes...can’t see land; confident, yet vulnerable

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