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Running Header: UNIT II: PREVENT, DETECT AND SUPPRESS1Unit II: Prevent, Detect and SuppressColumbia Southern UniversityMOS 5301: Fire Protection TechnologySteven GillespieJuly 17, 2020Introduction
Unit II: Prevent, Detect and Suppress2The realization that fire detection saves lives and property is not a new concept. Fire alarm systems date back to the 1850’s and used a two-way box to send notificationof a fire to an alarm station, where the information was relayed via operator to a fire station. Technological progression provided for much needed change in the process and have made it to where fire systems are much more dynamic and require zero human interaction for notification in the event of a fire. However, fire systems are now so dynamic that it requires very detailed planning during construction or renovation as well as a thorough analysis of the fire potential in buildings. When designers take time to properly analyze the contents of a building and understand the potential fire hazards associated, they can properly design fire protection systems and reduce the risk to life and property. Failure to understand how design and planning work together, results in unwarranted lose.SystemsFire systems are an important factor when planning and designing any type of building and must meet the standards set forth By the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), specifically NFPA 5000: Building construction and safety code. NFPA 5000 was not designed to bear additional cost burden on building owners but is there to protect occupants and property through set standards and basic levels of protection. Proper planning, construction and scheduled services for fire systems provide for a multi-layer protection and safeguard for all occupants and property should a fire occur. No individual system is 100% reliable, therefore buildings with redundant levels of protection ensure that should a fire occur, one or more of the installed systems
Unit II: Prevent, Detect and Suppress3will function as designed to contain/control the fire and ultimately protect the building occupants (Parker & Hughes, 2017). Fire systems are broken down into two main categories, passive and active protective features. Passive protective measures include fire-resistance materials used during construction or renovation and precautions designed to contain a fire locally. Certain types of assemblies can be used during construction which provide safe passage through an emergency egress routes. Active protective measures include systems such as automatic suppression devices and detection devices. Detection devices do more than just detect fire or smoke though, they are an early warning devicethat can send out audible alarms, warning those in an area that there is fire. An example of a detection device would be a common household smoke detector. An example of the automatic suppression system is a sprinkler system used in most types of buildings.

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