AP English Language Glossary - AP English Language Glossary 1 Abstract Language 2 Ad Hominem 3 Allegory 4 Alliteration 5 Allusion 6 Ambiguity 7 Analogy

AP English Language Glossary - AP English Language Glossary...

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AP English Language Glossary 1. Abstract Language Language describing ideas and qualities rather than observable or specific things, people, or places. 2. Ad Hominem In an argument, this is an attack on the person rather than on the opponent's ideas. It comes from the Latin meaning "against the man." 3. Allegory A work that functions on a symbolic level 4. Alliteration The repetition of initial consonant sounds, such as "Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers." 5. Allusion A reference contained in a work 6. Ambiguity An event or situation that may be interpreted in more than one way. 7. Analogy A literary device employed to serve as a basis for comparison. It is assumed that what applies to the parallel situation also applies to the original circumstance. In other words, it is the comparison between two different items. 8. Anaphora Repetition of a word, phrase, or clause at the beginning of two or more sentences in a row. This is a deliberate form of repetition and helps make the writer's point more coherent. 9. Anecdote A story or brief episode told by the writer or a character to illustrate a point. 10. Annotation Explanatory notes added to a text to explain, cite sources, or give bibliographical data. 11. Antecedent The word, phrase, or clause to which a pronoun refers. 12. Antithesis The presentation of two contrasting images. The ideas are balanced by phrase, clause, or paragraphs. "To be or not to be . . ." "It was the best of times; it was the worst of times . . ." "Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country . . ." 13. Argument A single assertion or a series of assertions presented and defended by the writer 14. Argumentation The purpose of this rhetorical mode is to prove the validity of an idea, or point of view, by presenting sound reasoning, discussion, and argument that thoroughly convince the reader. 15. Assonance Repetition of a vowel sound within two or more words in close proximity 16. Asyndeton Commas used (with no conjunction) to separate a series of words. The parts are emphasized equally when the conjunction is omitted; in addition, the use of commas with no intervening conjunction speeds up the flow of the sentence. X, Y, Z as opposed to X, Y, and Z. 17. Attitude the relationship an author has toward his or her subject, and/or his or her audience 18. Authority Arguments that draw on recognized experts or persons with highly relevant experience. 19. Backing Support or evidence for a claim in an argument 20. Balance a situation in which all parts of the presentation are equal, whether in sentences or paragraphs or sections of a longer work. 21. Begging the Question Often called circular reasoning, __ occurs when the believability of the evidence depends on the believability of the claim. 22. Cacophony harsh and discordant sounds in a line or passage in a literary word.

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