Phil 104-9-13-II

Phil-II

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Unformatted text preview: atic Citizenship o Socratic attitude towards one’s polis Critiquing failings of one’s own society, but as a form of loyalty • Socrates described as a gadfly to Athens – annoys them but improves them through relentless critique o Reverence towards accomplishments of political community o Piety to Laws and institutions o Polis should strive for the greatest justice, but within the confines of the law o Requires engaged citizens o Question of civil disobedience 1 Civ. Disob. = violation of certain laws you take to be unjust to demonstrate their immorality. Also, involves an acceptance of the punishment that comes with breaking said laws o Morality and Citizenship Without citizenship a human becomes a “non ­person” loses right to rights and political membership • To be full human requires membership in a political community • Thus, to be free we must follow the laws we take part in creating • Interdependence between moral life and citizenship o Republic: polis replicates structure of human soul Keys Terms o Moral intellectualism – morals can be determined rationally Morality admits of truth value – opposed to emotivism • Emotivism – morals involve states without rational justification o Deontology – study of duty – implies the absolutelessness of the truth...
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2013 for the course PHI 104 taught by Professor Roberteason during the Spring '07 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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