The Book Industry

The Book Industry - The Book Industry o A brief history of...

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The Book Industry o A brief history of books Universal education In 1642 Massachusetts became the first colony to pass a law requiring that every child be taught to read. Universal education became the law in the united states in the 1820’s McGuffey’s Eclectic Readers, first published in 1836, and used pictures to reinforce vocabulary. There were more than 120 million copies in print by the end of the 1800’s. Kind of like hooked on phonics. Books became the way of addressing social issues Books and Slavery Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an 1845 autobiography, told the horrors of slavery. Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, published in 1851, and was the first national best seller. The American publishing industry grew after the Civil War. Led the way for other autobiographical books The Industrial Revolution Machine-made paper was produced from inexpensive wood pulp instead of cotton and linen fiber. Publishers tried to disguise books as both newspaper and magazines to take advantage of lower postage rates. In 1914 Congress established a special postal “book rate” because it realized that the distribution of book was good for the country.
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It was like shipping a dictionary, so the congress helped them out by lowering the shipping cost. Democratization of knowledge
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course MC 2001 taught by Professor Sanders during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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The Book Industry - The Book Industry o A brief history of...

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