Gilgamesh - Eric Carlson HC221H CRN16256 Verse Prose and Their Distinctions in the Epic of Gilgamesh Spawning from the beginning of written

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Eric Carlson 10/02/07 HC221H, CRN16256 Verse, Prose and Their Distinctions in the Epic of Gilgamesh Spawning from the beginning of written language, The Epic of Gilgamesh is one of the first epic poems ever recorded. Its uniqueness rises from the time it was written, circa 2500 to 1500 BCE. With this age come the inherent shortcomings of preservation. The standard version, stabilized around 650 BCE and written in Cuneiform, was fragmented and damaged. Cuneiform was also never translated into the languages which replaced them and therefore, there is uncertainty in some of the passages. Nonetheless, several recent translations offer a slightly different interpretation and form of the text. Examined here is a prose version, translated by N. K. Sandars, and a verse version by Benjamin R. Foster. While both serve as a similar telling of the story, they serve as a good example of how even a slight change in way the story is read, or use of repetition can change or reinforce a passages gravity. This first example is taken from the first few lines of the last paragraph in the prologue.
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course HC 221 taught by Professor Thompson during the Spring '08 term at University of Oregon.

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Gilgamesh - Eric Carlson HC221H CRN16256 Verse Prose and Their Distinctions in the Epic of Gilgamesh Spawning from the beginning of written

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