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Running head: QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE AND ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS 1 Rough Draft Qualitative Research Critique and Ethical Considerations Michele L. Agresti Grand Canyon University: NRS-433V October 28, 2020
QUALITATIVE RESEARCH CRITIQUE AND ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS Rough Draft Qualitative Research Critique and Ethical Considerations Background of Study Postpartum depression (PPD) is a highly treatable medical condition that affects an estimated 1 in 7 women (15%). Even though PPD is recognized as a major depressive disorder and a treatable public health problem, the condition is often underdiagnosed (Jardri et al., 2010). Half of the women affected with PPD have never experienced depression before. For 30%-70% of these women, the effects of PPD can last for one year or more and symptoms range from mild to severe. In severe cases, depression can interfere with mother-infant bonding and the care of one’s self and newborn child, marital stress and even divorce. If not addressed the child can experience long term effects such as poor cognitive and social-emotional development (ADAA, 2020). Some women experience symptoms so severe they may be at risk of harming themselves or their child(ren). During the postpartum period providing the symptomatic mother with antidepressants and early psychotherapeutic interventions have proven to have improve the mother’s mood significantly (Jardri et al., 2010). However, the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force claims that education, counseling and/or therapy can prevent PPD for some women at increased risk (March of Dimes, 2020). There have been many types of screening strategies proposed and utilized for secondary prevention, one of these is the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). This tool has allowed for a 29.1% increase in women identified as having an increased risk for PPD (Jardri et al., 2010). However, when in combination with the appropriately trained healthcare professional (RN, nurse midwife, nurse practitioner) the potential to further increase that number with the addition of disease prevention must be looked at further.

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