Local Personnel provided Preventive and Curative care.docx...

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Local Personnel provided Preventive and Curative care The locally trained nurses and clerks were all mothers or fathers. They knew the nuances of the language and the local beliefs. They were responsible for the immunisation, the nutrition of the children through monitoring of the weight curve, advising the mothers on the means to achieve an adequate birth interval, and the treatment of common conditions. For only 10% of the children did they consider it needful to see the doctor or bring the child to be seen and continue with the care on his advice? Records were kept by the mother The records consisted of a growth chart with the weight for age chart, information on the family, immunization, and any reason for special care set out clearly in an easily recognizable form. These were protected by a polythene envelope and carefully kept by the mothers. A study showed that these fewer records were lost than occurred in hospitals which had proper records and filing systems. These records reduced the waiting time considerably and were taken to whichever other health unit the mother attended. A building designed to meet the needs of the mothers, the children and the staff Patients did not like a waiting room that was far from the physician's office, but crowding near the door of the consulting room had to be avoided. A low wall separated the nurses’ station and the waiting area for the mothers. They were called in groups. While waiting, the children were weighed by staff with no medical training. Low benches provide the mothers comfortable seating with their children on their laps. There was drinking water and clean toilets for both mothers and children. Staff discussions were held every week Discussions on important issues relating to the health of their children took place while the busy mothers waited in the line of flow. After discussion, medications were made available to the nurses for distribution to the mothers to avoid further waiting and delays at the pharmacy. Satisfaction The level of satisfaction among the mothers was high. They were seen quickly, usually by local nurses and clerks whom with their regular visits, they came to know well. For the staff, there was the satisfaction of playing a major role in the care for people from their own communities. For the doctor, it was the satisfaction that a good level of preventive and curative care was offered to an average of 400 children a day. His/her time was largely taken up by the care of the more severe or unusual and often more interesting conditions.
Understanding why child welfare clinic attendance and growth of children in the nutrition surveillance programme is below target: lessons learnt from a mixed methods study in Ghana Faith Agbozo , Esi Colecraft , Albrecht Jahn & Timothy Guetterman Abstract Background Growth monitoring and promotion (GMP) programmes promote not only child health but serve as a service delivery strategy to enhance coverage for other crucial nutrition- specific interventions. This study compared community-based and facility-based GMP

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