22 - Chapter 9. Patterns of inheritance All forms of life...

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Chapter 9. Patterns of inheritance All forms of life continually changes phenotype. Don’t believe me? Look around the room. Organisms alter phenotype to achieve a competitive advantage against members of the same species or members of other species. Adapt to capture more energy Avoid becoming another species dinner If the change in phenotype is to be passed on to the next generation, then a change in the genetic information must occur. If the force that drives the change is from nature, it is called evolution. If the force that drives the change is from human intervention, it is called breeding. If the force that drives the change is from humans directly manipulating DNA, it is called genetic engineering. The focus of chapter 9 is on how genes are manipulated either by evolution or by breeding. 1
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The science of genetics has ancient roots. The domestication of animals is a form of genetics. Dogs are direct ancestors of the wolf. All of the food on the shelves of your supermarket have been selected and breed for enhanced something. A farmer noticed that one cow gave more milk than all the others. His neighbor has a bull from a cow that gave more milk than all the others. By breeding the bull and cow together (P generation),
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course BIOS 101 taught by Professor Plantz during the Spring '08 term at UNL.

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22 - Chapter 9. Patterns of inheritance All forms of life...

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