5 how many electrons does cu have protons neutrons 6

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Unformatted text preview: nt bonds ionization potential temporary dipole bond energy crosslinks intermetallics thermodynamics bond-energy curve (bondenergy well) crystalline materials kinetics thermoplastic polymer ductile long-range order thermoset polymer bond-force curve electron affinity metallic bonds valence electrons electron configuration monomers van der Waals bond brittle electron transfer Pauli exclusion principle Young’s modulus coefficient of thermal expansion electronegativity permanent dipole | v v bond length | e-Text Main Menu | Textbook Table of Contents pg056 [V] G12 7-27060 / IRWIN / Schaffer 56 Part I ak 01-03-97 pgm 1-19-98 QC2 Fundamentals HOMEWORK PROBLEMS ........................................................................................................................................................................... SECTION 2.2 Atomic Structure 1. How many valence electrons do elements in Group IIIB have? How many valence electrons do elements in Group VB have? 2. In Example Problem 2.2–1 we showed why Si and Ge are similar. What element is next in this series? What is its electron configuration? 3. Would you expect Ca and Zn to exhibit similar properties? Why or why not? 4. What would be some of the consequences if electron energies were not quantized? 5. How many electrons does Cu have? Protons? Neutrons? 6. Write the electronic structure of C. How can C form four equal bonds? Covalent bonds are regions of high electron density and, hence, repel one another. Anticipate the bonding geometry (bond angle) of the four bonds in covalently bonded carbon. 7. The oxides of most metals are energetically “downhill” from the energy of the pure metal. Metals that oxidize generally gain weight in the early stages of oxidation. Do you want this behavior for “the gold standard,” which is a metal stored for long periods of time and used to calibrate dollars? 8. Is it possible to have pure liquid water at 1 C 30 F ? 9. The flow rate of molasses can be described as an Arrhenius process with an activation energy of a...
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2013 for the course PHYS 2202 taught by Professor Sowell during the Spring '10 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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