Although silicon is not usually considered a metal it

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Unformatted text preview: s in the corresponding equations are not known with | e-Text Main Menu | Textbook Table of Contents 41 pg042 [V] G2 7-27060 / IRWIN / Schaffer 42 Part I pgm 1-14-98 plm/iq 3-21-98 M1 Fundamentals TABLE 2.5–1 Latent heat of fusion, melting temperatures, and coefficients of thermal expansion for some metallic elements. Latent heat of fusion (J/g)* 113 368 397 1800 Row III metals Na Mg Al Si† Row IV metals K Se Zn Cu Mn Fe Co Ni Cr V Ti 371 922 933 1685 70 25 25 3 63 67 113 205 268 272 276 297 331 410 418 Material Melting temperature (K) 336 494 693 1358 1517 1809 1768 1726 2130 2175 1943 83 37 35 17 22 12 12 13 6 8 9 Coefficient of thermal expansion ~ 10 6 C !* * Adapted from the CRC Handbook of Tables for Applied Engineering Science, copyright CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 1979. Although silicon is not usually considered a metal, it is included here for comparison. † sufficient accuracy to facilitate calculation of the absolute values of bond length, bond energy, modulus of elasticity, and coefficient of thermal expansion. The values of these properties for engineering materials are usually directly measured in the laboratory. ....................................................................................................................................... DESIGN EXAMPLE 2.5–2 The bond-energy curves for two engineering materials are shown in Figure 2.5–3. Your task is to select the better material for use in each application described below. FIGURE 2.5–3 Energy A comparison of the bondenergy curves for two hypothetical materials, A and B. x A | v v B | e-Text Main Menu | Textbook Table of Contents pg043 [R] G1 7-27060 / IRWIN / Schaffer pgm 1-14-98 plm/iq 3-21-98 MP1 Chapter 2 43 a. A beam that shows little deflection under moderate loads b. A crucible to be used at a high service temperature c. [R]A device designed to sense changes in /temperature by changing its dimensions G15 7-27060 / IRWIN Schaffer Solution a. The application requires high stiffness. A material with a high value of Young’s modulus is...
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2013 for the course PHYS 2202 taught by Professor Sowell during the Spring '10 term at Georgia Tech.

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