Sport and Globalization

Sport and Globalization - nations. Examples During the...

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Expanding The Horizons Sport and Globalization
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Issues of Globalization Less nationalistic displays and more commercial displays. Some corporations have larger economies than some countries. International sports are used as a means to promote the interests of corporate capitalism.
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Issues for Athletes Personal adjustment of migrating athletes. Rights of athletes as workers in various nations. Impact of talent migration on the nations from and to which athletes migrate. Impact of athlete migration on patterns of personal, cultural, and national identity formation.
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Sporting Goods and Globalization Corporations are taxed at much lower rate when they move products from country to country. It is cost-effective to sell large amounts of goods in wealthy countries and locate production facilities in labor-intensive poor
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Unformatted text preview: nations. Examples During the 1990s, athletic shoes in the U.S. that cost well over $100 per pair were being produced by workers making less than 25 cents per hour and other similar small amounts in some Asian countries. Primary culprit was Nike. Sporting Goods Manufacturing Brenda Pitts states that the sport industry is composed of three components: Sport Performance Sport Promotion Sport Production Sporting Goods Manufacturing Sporting goods constitute a $150 billion global industry. Nike was most exposed for taking advantage of Asian workers. Nike Social Movement organized. Nike Social Movement Objectives Subsistence wage. Safe working conditions. Freedom to organize. Respect for the human rights of Nike workers....
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course STAT 110 taught by Professor Johnson during the Fall '07 term at South Carolina.

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Sport and Globalization - nations. Examples During the...

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