Forensic Science- Chapter 3

Forensic Science- Chapter 3 - Chapter 3: Physical Evidence...

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Chapter 3: Physical Evidence I. Common Types of Physical Evidence A) Blood, semen, and saliva, Documents, Drugs, Explosives, Fibers, Fingerprints, Firearms and Ammunition, Glass, Hair, Impressions, Organs and Physiological Fluids, Paint, Petroleum Products, Plastic Bags; Plastic, Rubber, and other Polymers; Powder Residues, Serial Numbers, Soil and Minerals, Tool Marks, Vehicle Lights, and Wood and other Vegetative Matter II. The Significance of Physical Evidence A) Identification 1) Identification- process of determining a substance’s physical or chemical identity 2) First you need a reference sample, then you need a number of tests (5,6) to prove the identity, B) Comparison 1) Comparison- process of ascertaining whether two or more objects have a common origin 2) First you need a reference sample, run tests, conclusion if came from same source 3) If one or more properties selected for comparison do not agree, then analyst will conclude that they aren’t the same 4) Probability, frequency of occurrence of an event, is key
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course CHEM 101 taught by Professor Krull during the Fall '07 term at Northeastern.

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Forensic Science- Chapter 3 - Chapter 3: Physical Evidence...

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