OL109 Notes (1).pdf - Remember u2013 u201cThe meaning of...

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Remember – “The meaning of any message lies in the receiver Lesson 1: Take a look in your textbook and identify the three needs communication fulfills and the goals that communication can potentially satisfy. The linear model of communication: suggests that we communicate in a linear or straight line. The sender transmits a message through a channel or channels to a receiver. As the message moves through the channel, it is subject to noise . This model infers that you can either be a sender or a receiver but not both at the same time. The channel can be any method of transmitting the message such as oral (talking) or email or phone or smell etc. Choosing the ‘right’ channel may be essential to helping communicate the message you want the receiver to understand and therefore should be carefully chosen by a responsible communicator. That said, it may not be possible to always determine the ‘right’ channel or the ‘right’ channel might change over time. Noise: noise is ANYTHING that disrupts the transmission of a message. Physical noise External noise from the environment (i.e. loud sounds like a truck driving by or lots of people talking etc.) Physiological noise Hearing or vision issues - wearing glasses and if not wearing, experiencing noise in the transmission of a visual message... if I can’t ‘see’ it, the message is disrupted and I can’t ‘read’ it or ‘take in’ the information properly Articulation issues – when a speaker has a lisp or an accent and pronounces words in a way that I find hard to understand, this is considered noise from a physiological source.
Biological issues – hunger or pain. If I’m in pain because I have a headache and it distracts me from the message being sent to me, this is physiological noise with a biological basis. Any internal thought process that impacts the transmission of a message is noise. When you talk to yourself (your internal voice or private self-speech) you are paying attention to yourself and not to the message. For example, when someone is talking to you and you start to think about what you’re going to say when they stop talking, you are inserting psychological noise into the communication setting. Semantic noise When a sender and a receiver apply different meanings to the same word or message. To me, the word “sick” infers an illness of some kind but to my son, sometimes the word “sick” means “cool”. Semantic noise may also happen when a word is used that a receiver does not understand or a hand signal is used that is not understood. The Transactional model of communication: is seen as a reciprocal event. The intent, in any communication, is to build shared sustained meaning and this is done through the cooperation and participation of all members in a communication situation. Each message that is sent will build on previous messages and therefore it is important to consider all the aspects of a message because once a message has been sent, it will impact future messages as well as the possible reinterpretation of past messages.

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