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RelativeResourceManager11 - Speed of a Wave on a String...

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Speed of a Wave on a String We’ve seen that the speed of a wave on a string doesn’t depend on the amplitude or the frequency. What does it depend on? More tension pulls the string back to equilibrium faster, so we might expect that to speed up the wave. A heavier string will swing around more slowly, so we might expect that to slow down the wave. The wave doesn’t care about the total mass of the string, so we’re probably more interested in the linear mass density (mass per unit length) — how heavy a single bit of string is. 32 restoring force! Linear Mass Density μ The linear mass density ( μ ) of a string is a measure of the string’s “heaviness”. Thicker ropes have a higher linear mass density than thinner ropes. Steel cables have a higher linear mass density than nylon climbing ropes. etc. If you know the linear mass density, and you know how long your piece of rope is ( L ), then you know the mass of that piece of rope: m = μ L .
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