ap-lit-2-21-17.pdf - AP Lit Comp 2/21 u201817 1 Lead the...

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1. Lead the discussion group 1 2. “The Flowers” – focus on thesis statements and essay outline 3. Look at sample thesis statements for The Great Gatsby excerpt and prompt 4. For next class…Group 2 lead discussion – read, annotate, and outline for Under the Feet of Jesus . AP Lit & Comp 2/21 ‘17
Take a few minutes to convene with your group and then take it away! “Judges” p. 191 -244 Lead the Discussion Group 1
Remember: this essay is all about how well you can analyze an excerpt of prose and write an analysis of that excerpt. Analysis is just a fancy word for breaking something down into pieces to better understand how it works. Your thesis MUST speak to all parts of the prompt and accomplish the task(s) that the prompt is asking you to do. Essay #2 is not concerned with theme or MOWAW, so you don’t have to worry about that. The Prose Prompt: Essay #2
To analyze and write the essay for the prose prompt, a number of strategies may be helpful. 1. Complete a quick SAYS/DOES/HOW chart for the excerpt. This organizes your thinking and helps prevent you from only writing plot summary. Your essay will then focus mainly on the HOW part of the chart. (How does the author use devices to create characterization or meaning?) 2. Use SATDO to determine how the author shows character and then decide which devices (within SATDO) the author is using to create the characterization. For instance: “Steinbeck crafts sharp, staccato syntax and harsh diction in George’s dialogue to illustrate that George’s patience and grace for Lennie have run out.” The Prose Prompt:
In a well-organized essay discuss HOW Alice Walker conveys the meaning of "The Flowers" and HOW she prepares the reader for the ending of this short story . Consider at least two elements of the writer's craft such as imagery, symbol, setting, narrative pace, diction, and style. 1. This prompt wants you to discuss the overall meaning of the story AND how Walker prepares the reader for the ending of the story.

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