Jasey_Deleea_Meeker_AP_Literature_Syllabus_FINAL.pdf - AP...

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AP English Literature and CompositionAP Audit SyllabusCourse Overview and ObjectivesThis Advanced Placement Literature class is open to all who are willing to commit to thechallenging course of study. Two documents inform all instruction and curricular decisions: theAP Course DescriptionandUnderstanding University Success, a document “designed to answerone question: What must students know and be able to do to succeed in entry-level universitycourses?” TheAP Course Descriptionoffers specific guidance in choosing texts, preparing for thetest, and meeting the high expectations outlined by the College Board.Understanding UniversitySuccess, created by the Association of American Universities to guide not high schools butuniversities, offers detailed standards in the areas of reading and writing which ensures the courseis consistent with the expectations of the top universities in the country. In general, however, thisclass provides sustained, explicit instruction in the areas of:Literary terms and devicesAnalytical reading strategiesRhetorical devices and strategiesStyle analysisWriting in various forms for various purposesConventions and traits of effective expository proseStudents in this class find robust support––in class, outside class, and online––if they strugglewith some aspect of the text or a paper they are writing or revising. A central premise in the classis that they can always do better if given useful feedback and the opportunity to use that feedbackto improve their performance. Such support is also essential given the open enrollment policywhich ensures there are students in the class who are willing to work hard but have much to learnif they are to succeed.Guiding Principles: ReadingStudents read widely and deeply across different genres, complementing the study of literaturewith literary criticism and quality nonfiction from magazines such asThe New Yorker. Studentsread daily both in and outside of class, and always with some critical purpose which they achieveby taking notes, annotating texts, or writing. When possible, students receive a copy of the text tomark up.Each week, for example, students get a poem on Monday which they read and annotate fora different purpose each day, culminating in an in- class essay on that poem on Friday. Thetask will be further complicated by receiving a pair of poems which are thematicallyrelated and which they must connect not only to each other but the core literary work(novel or play) we are studying at that time. Through repeated, critical reading and suchstrategies as annotating, students develop rigorous analytical reading skills.In addition to the core readings––poems, critical readings, novels, and plays––eachstudent reads three novels on their own outside of class. Upon completing these works,students write an in-class essay using past AP free response prompts to practice for the APexam and assess their understanding of the book.
Guiding Principles: Writing

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