Domestic and Foreign Politics in the Cold War

Domestic and Foreign Politics in the Cold War - Morgan...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Morgan O’Bryan Martin Political Science 391W Professor Stucker April 3, 2008 Domestic and Foreign Politics in the Cold War Domestic politics played a large role in shaping U.S. foreign policy after WWII and throughout the Cold War. Prior to World War II foreign policy was considered to be a secondary issue to the public, interest groups, and different social movements. Domestic issues were typically at the fore front of discussion. Throughout the 1940s and 50s, new and established groups began to get heavily involved in the foreign policymaking process. These groups were overwhelmingly anticommunist and extremely conservative. It was groups like these that helped to fuel the wave of anticommunist sentiment that swept across the nation, represented by McCarthyism and the Red Scare. It was these social movements and domestic policies that helped to sustain the Cold War. Prior to WWII and the start of the Cold War, foreign policy was something that public was typically not involved in, and fell primarily to the executive branch, and the legislative branch as well. As World War II came to an end and the fight against communism arose as a national concern, US
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 3

Domestic and Foreign Politics in the Cold War - Morgan...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online