Egypt_1_Archaic___Predynastic_2007

Egypt_1_Archaic___Predynastic_2007 - THE RISE OF...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 T HE R ISE OF C IVILIZATION [Egypt2007Lec1.wpd] February 13, 2007 T. D'Altroy E GYPT I: P REDYNASTIC AND A RCHAIC (4100-2650 BC) ©Terence N. D’Altroy [main sources: de Montmollin lecture notes; Trigger et al. 1983:44-69; Baines and Malek 1990; Wenke 1997, 1999] Introduction 1. overview of Egyptian civilization a. sequence from pre-civilized chiefdoms b. through early states and empires 2. topics for today a. introduction to Egyptian civilization b. physical setting c. chronological sequence d. pre-state chiefdoms to earliest state e. I MPORTANCE OF E GYPTIAN CIVILIZATION 1. early evidence for a transition: after ca. 3100 BC a. from chiefdom b. to civilization 2. like Mesopotamia a. studied by archaeologists and historians for long time b. Egyptian history: strong influence on "classical" general schemes for the origins of complex society 1. Childe, Frankfort, Steward, Toynbee, Wittfogel 3. key concepts a. ancient theocracy 1. god-king 2. evolution of religion: polytheism to monotheism and back b. importance of irrigation 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4. reasons for high impact a. best known and renowned among scholars and the general public b. remarkable material culture: long history of looting 1. mortuary items 2. stone monuments: e.g., obelisks, statues c. early writing 1. decipherment: exciting intellectual story d. tied to events in Old Testament: Rameses (mistakenly) as the villain e. early interest for Mediterranean peoples 1. e.g., Herodotus: description of the late Egyptian civilization of his time (440 BC) 2. became part of Macedonian and Roman empires 3. breadbasket for Rome f. Napoleon's conquest 1. archaeological looting g. rival collectors of antiquities 1. British Museum 2. Louvre 3. Metropolitan h. strong world-wide interest in ancient Egyptian civilization 1. UNESCO effort for Aswan dam salvage: 1950-60s i. preservation of organic artifacts 1. arid climate a. paper, basketry, ropes, cereal remains, etc. 2. ancient Egyptian interest in mummification a. well-preserved human remains b. preoccupation with afterlife: leaves many grave goods 5. unusual features in the way that society worked a. political centralization combined with low degree of urbanism 1. civilization without cities (Wilson) 2. but absence of strong cities (city states) made it easier to unite the whole of Egypt 3. environmental redundancy curtailed development of localized craft specialization 4. easy river transport precluded need to concentrate activities in one place 5. both factors that promoted urbanism elsewhere b. bureaucratic complexity combined with most of population living in self-sufficient villages and towns 1. only strange if one assumes that bureaucracy develops to manage the entire polity and its people c. clear ecological determinant tied to political cycles of political centralization and decentralization: Nile flood levels d. but sociopolitical history is complex 2
Background image of page 2
G EOGRAPHIC S ETTING 1. Nile River a. key element in Egyptian civilization's geography: past and present b. flows south to north
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 14

Egypt_1_Archaic___Predynastic_2007 - THE RISE OF...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online