Pre-Midterm Notes - Monday Lecture I Pope a...

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Monday, January 23, 2012—LectureI.Popea.Catholicism/Protestantisma.i.Pope was born a Catholic in 1688. a.ii.Everyone hoped that James II would remain childless; when he did, they denied that it was his legitimate son. That rumor was the refusal of the powerful Protestant establishment to accept a Catholic monarch in England. a.iii.In order to avoid a return to Catholicism, William and Mary assumed the throne.b.Popeb.i.How could it have been for Pope, to grow up as a Catholic in a world in which the people rejoiced that a Catholic king had fled?b.i.1.If a Catholic priest openly bore his vocation, he could be imprisoned for life.b.ii.Pope suffered from TB of the bones, which caused him excruciating pain. He had frequent headaches, he was bent, crippled. b.ii.1.“this long disease, my life.”—Pope c.Timelinec.i.1649-1660c.i.1.Puritan Commonwealthc.ii.1669 (Restoration)-1685c.ii.1.Charles IIc.iii.1685-1688 (desposed)c.iii.1.James IIc.iv.1689-1702c.iv.1.William and Mary (died 1694)c.v.1702-1714c.v.1.Annec.vi.1714-1727c.vi.1.George I II.The Rape of the Lock–The Problems of the Trivial and the Heroic, the Past and the Presenta.Pope as Outsider/Insider a.i.Pope was a translator of Homer—that was what secured his income. Everywhere behind his verse is his encounter with Homer’s great epics. a.i.1.How can Pope possibly dream to succeed in the shadow of Homer, in the shadow of the legendary epics? a.ii.zeugmaa.ii.1.a device that works by connecting one word—usually a verb—to two quite different things. a.ii.1.a.“Or stain her Honour or her new Brocade”—staining her Honour is devastating; staining her Brocade is entirely different. a.ii.1.b.“Or lose her Heart, or Necklace, at a Ball.”a.ii.1.c.“Does sometimes Counsel take—and sometimes Tea.”
a.ii.2.Rape of the Lock is famous for its zeugma. It is an example of how a particular device can carry significant suggestions for the work as a whole and Pope’s whole accomplishment as a satirist. III.Milton and Popea.from Milton’s Epic to Pope’s Mock-Epica.i.mock-epica.i.1.“A work in verse which employs the lofty manner, the high and serious tone, and the supernatural machinery of epic to treat of a trivial subject and theme in such a ways to make both subject and theme ridiculous…the acknowledged masterpiece in this genre is Pope’s The Rape of the Lock. a.i.1.a. Part of the Augustine Response was that you could take the burden as an inspiration—the mock-epic. a.i.1.b.Pope wrote this in the wake of Paradise Lost; compare the two. The heroic couplet in Milton’s is abundantly amplified in Pope’s. b.From Blank Verse to the Heroic Couplet b.i.heroic couplet b.i.1.“comprises rhymed decasyllables, nearly always iambic pentameters rhymed in pairs: one of the commonest forms in English poetry but of uncertain origin…throughout the 18c the heroic couplet was the most favoured verse form.” b.i.1.a. Pope perfected the couplet—two lines so closely linked that they work as a unit. In Pope, each of the lines tends to be end-stopped. Each line almost always ends with punctuation.

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