Notes - Notes Carbohydrates Chapter 4 Carbohydrate Metabolism After you eat a meal of carbohydrates blood glucose levels rise Beta cells in the

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Notes 2-21-08 Carbohydrates Chapter 4 Carbohydrate Metabolism After you eat a meal of carbohydrates, blood glucose levels rise. Beta cells in the pancreas produce insulin (a hormone that tells the rest of the cells in the body to take in glucose from the blood stream) in response to the raised blood glucose level. Once in other cells, glucose will go through glycolysis and turn into pyruvate, which is converted to acetyl coA, which goes through the TCA cycle, which leads to electron transport, and the carbohydrates are ultimately turned in to ATP, CO2, and H2O. Happens very fast- less than a couple of minutes. Other parts of the body involved with glucose: liver, muscles. The liver and muscle cells cannot store glucose, but they can store glycogen. Excess glucose turns in to acetyl coA, then into fat in the Adipose cells. Later, blood glucose drops and pancreas alpha cells produce glucagon. It does the opposite of what insulin, tries to raise blood glucose levels. Glucagon’s main target is the liver. It has enough glucose to get you through a few hours. The liver goes through
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PSYCH 100 taught by Professor Cave during the Spring '08 term at UMass (Amherst).

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Notes - Notes Carbohydrates Chapter 4 Carbohydrate Metabolism After you eat a meal of carbohydrates blood glucose levels rise Beta cells in the

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