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Notes 3-13-08 - Notes Proteins Objective 6 Describe...

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Notes 3-13-08 Proteins Objective 6: Describe possible paths protein can take in the body Amino Acids in the body follow the various pathways: Nonessential amino acids can be made from essential amino acids. Objective 7: •List the steps involved in nitrogen excretion (From when amino acids are broken down) Nitrogen Excretion Amino group converted to ammonia (NH3) Ammonia combines with CO2 and forms urea in the liver Urea transported from liver to kidneys, where the urea is filtered out of the blood. Urea moves on to the bladder, where it is mixed with water and secreted in urine by the bladder. Excess protein in the diet requires increased deamination, which creates more work for the liver and kidneys. It also requires more water for “flushing” the urea from the body. Objective 8: Explain nitrogen balance and give examples of conditions that would lead to positive or negative N balance. Nitrogen Balance N Balance = N Intake – N Output Intake > N Output : Positive N Balance (growth) Output > Intake: Negative N Balance (losing protein) Intake = Output: Nitrogen Equilibrium
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Objective 9: Know protein RDA for adults for the exam, be able to convert kg to lbs and lbs to kg (see pages W and X at end of textbook) Adult RDA = 0.8 grams/kg body weight. 1 kg = 2.2 pounds so to convert your weight from pounds to kg, divide by 2.2., then multiply times 0.8 to get the RDA. Infants and children need more protein, on a body weight basis, than adults do. Protein requirements increase in pregnancy & lactation, and during times with stress (fevers, infection, trauma, surgery, etc.) Most Americans get adequate protein.
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