200824502-Critical-Neg.docx - NDI 2013 \u2013 6WS \u2013 CRITICAL NEGLECT AFFIRMATIVE NEGATIVE*CRITICAL NEGLECT AFF First Affirmative Constructive 1AC \u2013

200824502-Critical-Neg.docx - NDI 2013 u2013 6WS u2013...

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NDI 2013 – 6WS – CRITICAL NEGLECT AFFIRMATIVE & NEGATIVE
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**CRITICAL NEGLECT AFF**
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First Affirmative Constructive
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1AC – Contention One Contention One U.S. thought concerning Latin America relegates the region to political irrelevance. Our hemispheric strategy is permeated with outright neglect towards a region that U.S. policymakers regard with ambivalence and disdain Wiarda, 1999 (Howard J., “United States Policy Toward Latin America: A New Era of Benign Neglect”, in Neighborly Adversaries: Readings in U.S.-Latin American Relations, Ed Michael LaRosa and Frank O. Mora, p.257-263) Like Falcoff, Howard Wiarda, a well-known Latin Americanist and foreign policy expert who has taught at National Defense University, and the Center for Strategic and International Studies and currently works at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, is doubtful that Washington will pay much attention to Latin America with the end of the Cold War. He suggests the historically low priority of Latin America within the U.S. foreign policy community would again be the case with the end of the Cold War. At best, we are entering an era of "benign neglect." Latin America would be left to solve its own problems with only scant encouragement from Washington, according to Wiarda. Public opinion polls in the United States have shown a low level of empathy for or patience with Latin America. Wiarda states that US. policy interests are "likely to be sporadic and episodic rather than sustained" and that relations will be driven by domestic political considerations . This last point, as it relates to issues such as immigration and drug trafficking, has proven prophetic. In hindsight, however, the level of engagement since 1990 has been much more intense than Wiarda suggested in 1990, particularly as it relates to trade, drug trafficking, and summitry. Interestingly, Wiarda states here that benign neglect, rather than sparking concern or criticism in Latin America, would be welcomed because of the absence of interventionism. Latin America's standing in Washington, D.C., among the U.S. foreign policy community, and in terms of the rank ordering of foreign policy areas of priority, is precarious at best. Latin America has always been rather low on our priorities but now it runs the risk of slipping further still—almost out of sight. Ignored and viewed as unimportant, Latin America is in danger of falling to the level of sub-Saharan Africa as a region that some poor assistant secretary must be responsible for but that is seen as hopeless and not worth paying serious attention to. Many in the general foreign policy community (as distinct from Latin Americanists) see Latin America as a "black hole" into which are sucked immense amounts of U.S. aid and effort, as well as hopes and dreams, but out of which comes nothing in return except despair and grief.
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