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english final - Sinyavsky 1 HUAC: House of Undoing American...

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Sinyavsky 1
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Sinyavsky 2 HUAC: House of Undoing American Culture by: Philip Sinyavsky Eng 2100 UX13A Philip Sinyavsky Mr. Rollyson Eng 2100 UX13A
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Sinyavsky 3 12/22/07 HUAC: House of Undoing American Culture There have been two significant periods of severe anti-Communism in United States History, each being known as “Red Scare.” The Red Scare period in the United States started in 1917, but ended shortly after when suspicions subsided in 1920. These suspicions resurfaced in the late 1940s, and lasted until the early 1950s, with this period being known as the “Second Red Scare.” Both periods were represented by the notion of societal penetration by Communists through civil-service jobs and subliminal messaging through the entertainment business. Leading up to the Second Red Scare, Communists in the United States witnessed first-hand how the nation and its’ people were changing, specifically with their feelings towards the Communist Party. Newspapers were spreading unease with their infamously worded headlines that stood out miles away. In 1942, the Communist Party of the USA carried as many as 50,000 communist’s and left-wing ideologists, and people felt that a group that big could easily pose as a threat. Times were changing fast from World War II, but still, nothing had actually happened yet that would be evidence enough to prove that a secret Communist takeover was in the works, nothing until a few years later that is. In 1945, quite possibly the greatest factor in triggering conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union had occurred when an ex-Communist switched sides. Igor Gouzenko, a cipher clerk for the Soviet embassy stationed in Ottawa, spent his entire life training for a position to serve his mother country. Following his training, he spent two years as a cipher clerk, translating messages and codes. When his mission was completed, Igor was ordered to move back to the Soviet Union with his family.
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Sinyavsky 4 Dissatisfied with the quality of life and the politics of his homeland, Igor never made it back, and instead, he chose to live life in the U.S. Armed with a briefcase containing 109 files on Soviet espionage activities in the West, Igor submitted his knowledge to the U.S. government in hopes for a better life living in the States. Gouzenko's defection exposed Joseph Stalin's efforts to steal nuclear secrets, and the then-unknown technique of planting sleeper agents. With World War II over, the "Gouzenko Affair" helped change western perceptions of the Soviet Union from an ally to an enemy (CBC). Following Gouzenko was Elizabeth Bentley, another Communist spy that turned sides. Bentley exposed two networks of spies, ultimately naming over 80 Americans who had engaged in espionage for the Soviets. With this newfound knowledge, Americans were shook. Although Communism was feared, no direct actions had ever occurred to lead Americans
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course ENG 2100 taught by Professor Schrieber during the Fall '07 term at CUNY Baruch.

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english final - Sinyavsky 1 HUAC: House of Undoing American...

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