BUS 485 FINAL report.docx - Table of contents E-RECRUITMENT HOW CONTENTS INFLUENCE AN APPLICANTS\u2019 INTENTIONS INTRODUCTION In human resource management

BUS 485 FINAL report.docx - Table of contents E-RECRUITMENT...

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Table of contents E-RECRUITMENT: HOW CONTENTS INFLUENCE AN APPLICANTS’ INTENTIONS INTRODUCTION In human resource management context, recruitment is a process of sourcing and acquiring the right applicants to an organization. Essentially, the process involves seeking and attracting a pool of qualified applicants using various feasible recruitment methods. The conventional recruitment methods used by organizations consist of contacting friends or employee referrals, engaging executive search, using newspapers classified ads, and others. Whenever there are changes in company’s policy, technology, location, mergers, acquisitions, de-mergers, and employees’ resignation, this process continues to take place periodically to add, maintain, or re-adjust their workforce in accordance to the corporate and human resource planning (Tyson and York, 2000; Cascio, 1998). PROBLEM STATEMENT In times of fierce competition, being able to attract high-quality human resources is considered a true competitive advantage for organizations (e.g., Gatewood et al., 1993; Rynes, 1991; Turban and Greening, 1997). One way of doing so is via online recruitment, a method of attracting job candidates via the internet (Cullen, 2001). Strategically, online recruitment is part of the organizational recruitment process, which has been defined as the activity encompassing “all organizational practices and decisions that affect either the number or types of individuals who are willing to apply for or to accept a given vacancy” (Rynes, 1991, p. 429). Operationally, online recruitment contributes to recruitment process effectiveness by informing potential applicants about employment opportunities available at an organization. In particular, this paper focuses on the use of corporations’ own web sites for doing so. Other applications may include online job boards or online employment search sources such as social networking web sites (e.g., Jobster and LinkedIn). In practice, the use of technology for recruitment purposes is substantial.
Table of contents Recruitment web sites continue to multiply in numbers (Cober et al., 2000) and according to the Forrester Research Institute, expenditures on internet-based recruiting totaled $ 7 billion in 2005. Furthermore, about 96 percent of all companies use the internet for recruitment purposes. In addition, a survey of leading USA companies released in February 2006 by Booz Allen Hamilton (2007) found that over 50 percent of all new hires in 2005 originated from the internet – with the greatest number of those hires coming from corporations’ own web sites. In light of these figures, it is not surprising that technology-based recruitment has also been acknowledged in the academic arena by various scholars, resulting in specific future research agendas (e.g., Anderson, 2003; Cober et al., 2004a; Lievens and Harris, 2003). Among the specific issues to be investigated in this paper is the role of the internet in recruitment activities. Clearly, there is a need for a better understanding of how job seekers psychologically engage with an organization through its own corporate employment web site. Several studies have already dealt with this

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