GEOG130 Lecture7_Population

GEOG130 Lecture7_Population - How do you measure...

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How do you measure development? Lecture 6
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Human Development Index (HDI) The United Nations uses a weighted statistical formula to compare quality of life among countries called Human Development Index (HDI). It measures purchasing power (GNP) life expectancy, adult literacy, total fertility rate, calorie per intake, crude birth rate and, Crude death rate.
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Human Development Index Fig. 9-1: Developed by the United Nations, the HDI combines several measures of development: life expectancy at birth, adjusted GDP per capita, and knowledge (schooling and literacy).
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Development and Gender Gender-related development index Economic indicator of gender differences Social indicators of gender differences Demographic indicator of gender differences Gender empowerment Economic indicators of empowerment Political indicators of empowerment
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Gender-Related Development Index (GDI) Fig. 9-10: The GDI combines four measures of development, reduced by the degree of disparity between males and females.
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Development Strategies Development through self-sufficiency Elements of self-sufficiency approach Problems with self-sufficiency Development through international trade Rostow’s development model Examples of international trade approach Problems with international trade Financing development
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Rostow’s Continuum The five stages of economic development Traditional society Pre – conditions for growth Take-off The drive to maturity Age of mass consumption
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Stages of Economic Growth 1. Traditional society 1. subsistence economy based on farming, 1. Pre-conditions for take-off 1. Extractive industries develop, 2. Agriculture commercialized 3. a growth of infrastructure. 4. Single industry dominates. 1. Take-off 1. Manufacturing industries grow rapidly 2. Transport systems built. 3. Growth limited to one or two parts of the country ( growth poles ) 1. Drive to maturity 1. Growth self-sustaining 2. Economic growth spreads to all parts of the. 3. manufacturing expands as technology improves. 4. Rapid urbanization 1. High mass-consumption 1. Rapid expansion of tertiary industries. 1. Manufacturing declines.
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Rostow Debunked Developing countries unlikely to follow this path Traditional craft industries in existence before colonization 1. Colonization 1. Raw materials exported 2. cheap imports from colonial power 3. Infrastructure, Colonial powers built ports, but railways only constructed if sufficient local resources to make them profitable.
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Population Lecture 8 Geog 130 Test on Wednesday!!!!!!!
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Definitions Rates : Frequency of occurrence of an event during a given time frame for a designated population Crude Birth Rate : the annual number of live births per 1000 people Crude Death Rate : the annual number of live deaths per 1000 people Total Fertility Rate: The average number of children that would be born to each women if, during her childbearing
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course ENES 102 taught by Professor Biegel during the Fall '07 term at Maryland.

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GEOG130 Lecture7_Population - How do you measure...

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