2 the following diagram shows cosx with its linear

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Unformatted text preview: and f (0) = − sin(0) = 0 and f (0) = − cos(0) = −1. It follows that L0 (x) = f (0) + f (0)(x − 0) = 1 + 0(x − 0) = 1 for all x while T2,0 (x) = f (0) + f (0)(x − 0) + = 1 + 0(x − 0) + = 1− f (0) (x − 0)2 2 −1 (x − 0)2 2 x2 . 2 The following diagram shows cos(x) with its linear approximation and its second degree Taylor polynomial centered at x = 0. It is very easy to see that the second degree Taylor polynomial does a much better job approximating cos(x) over the interval [−2, 2] than does the linear approximation. We might guess that if f (x) has a third derivative at x = a, then by encoding the value f (a) along with f (a), f (a) and f (a), we may do an even better job of approximating f (x) near x = a than we did with either La (x) or with T2,a (x). As such we would be looking for a polynomial p(x) = c0 + c1 (x − a) + c2 (x − a)2 + c3 (x − a)3 such that DE Math 128 316 (B. Forrest)2 CHAPTER 4. Sequences and Series 4.5. Introduction to Taylor Series 1. p(a) = f (a), 2. p (a) = f (a), 3. p (a) = f (a), 4. p (a) = f (a). To find such a p(x), we follow the steps tha...
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This document was uploaded on 03/23/2013.

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