PHI 337 The Biomedical Implications of Over-the-Counter Diet Pills

PHI 337 The Biomedical Implications of Over-the-Counter Diet Pills

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The Biomedical Implications of Over-the-Counter Diet Pills
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Weight loss is something that everyone is interested in doing. Everywhere people are talking about it, doing it, or trying it. Some are so desperate to lose the unwanted pounds that they are resorting to extreme measures for obtaining this goal. Some extreme measures include but are not limited to highly restrictive diets, anorexia, bulimia, exercising too much (known as exercise bulimia) and diet pills. Diet pills are mainly sold over the counter and the general public can purchase them without a prescription. The popular over the counter diet pills are Stacker 2, Stacker 3, and Xenedrine, just to name a few. Many of these over the counter remedies are not FDA approved, regulated, proven effective in clinical trials, provide false claims, and can be harmful for the body. Products such as these contain a ridiculous amount of caffeine, in conjunction with other natural supplements, to induce thermogenesis, which is where ones body temperature is raised to speed up the body’s metabolism. In other words, the claim is that it speeds up your metabolism therefore making you lose weight. While they may work in the beginning, the truth is the body grows a tolerance to them and weight loss halts. The only way to keep the process going is to increase the amount you take which is not a good idea. This is so because diet pills, in general, raise blood pressure and heart beat because of the high amount of caffeine they contain and increasing the amount you take can induce heart attack, stroke or death. Only one has been approved for over the counter sale by the FDA. This new 1
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over the counter diet pill is called Alli (pronounced AL-eye). Also known as Orlistat, Alli is the first and only weight loss product to be proven effective in clinical trials, to be approved by the FDA, and to be combined with a comprehensive support program. GlaxoSmithKline, the manufacturer of Orlistat, expects Alli to be available in stores
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PHI 337 The Biomedical Implications of Over-the-Counter Diet Pills

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