ch20 notes - Chapter 20 Notes Drifting Toward Disunion...

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Chapter 20 Notes Drifting Toward Disunion 1854-1861 Stowe and Helper: Literary Incendiaries Harriet Beecher Stowe published Uncle Tom’s Cabin in 1852 to awaken the North to the wickedness of slavery by exposing its inhumanity. I. It helped start the Civil War, but it also helped win it. II. Many Northerners completely swore off the Fugitive Slave Law. III. It was very popular abroad, especially in England and France. Hinton R. Helper published The Impending Crisis of the South in 1857. I. He suggested that the nonslaveholding whites were the ones who suffered most from slavery. II. The South banned the book, but the Northern Republicans used it as campaign literature. The North-South Contest for Kansas Many Northerners began to migrate to Kansas, some sent by the New England Emigrant Aid Company to forestall the South. I. The South were outraged that there was now a possibility that Kansas would be free from slavery. On election day in 1855, proslaveryites poured in from Missouri to vote and they won; they set up a puppet government at Shawnee Mission. I. The Free-Soilers set up their own government in Topeka. In 1856, a group of proslavery raiders shot up and burned part of the free-soil town Lawrence, a prelude to a bloodier tragedy. Kansas in Convulsion John Brown, an abolitionist, led a band of his followers to Pottawatomie Creek in May 1856 where they slaughtered 5 proslaveryites. By 1857, Kansas had enough people to apply for statehood. I. The proslaveryites drafted the Lecompton Constitution, which infuriated free- soilers, who in turn boycotted the polls. II. It was passed with slavery. III. The new president Buchanan supported it. III.a. He helped bring about the end to the Democratic Party. IV. Senator Douglas fought against it and helped submit the entire Lecompton Constitution to a popular vote, where it was voted down by free-soilers. “Bully” Brooks and His Bludgeon Senator Charles Sumner, a highly disliked abolitionist, made “The Crime against Kansas” speech, which condemned proslavery men and insulted South Carolina and its senator. Congressman Preston S. Brooks of South Carolina, angered by Sumner’s speech, beat him with a cane until it broke.

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