English only and U.S. college composition.pdf - English...

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English Only and U.S. College CompositionAuthor(s): Bruce Horner andJohn TrimburSource:College Composition and Communication,Vol. 53, No. 4 (Jun., 2002), pp. 594-630Published by: National Council of Teachers of EnglishStable URL: Accessed: 22-04-2019 02:31 UTCJSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a widerange of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity andfacilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected]Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available atNational Council of Teachers of Englishis collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserveand extend access toCollege Composition and CommunicationThis content downloaded from 128.95.104.109 on Mon, 22 Apr 2019 02:31:58 UTCAll use subject to
Bruce HornerJohn TrimburEnglish Only and U.S. College CompositionIn this article, we identify in the formation of U.S. college composition courses a tacitpolicy of English monolingualism based on a chain of reifications of languages andsocial identity. We show this policy continuing in assumptions underlying argumentsfor and against English Only legislation and basic writers. And we call for an interna-tionalist perspective on written English in relation to other languages and the dynam-ics of globalization.T he fact that U.S. writing instruction is conducted in English seemscommonsensical. After all, though English is not the official language of theU.S., this is an English-speaking nation. As everyone from politicians and edu-cational policymakers to non-English speaking immigrants knows, in the U.S.,a knowledge of English is virtually required to get an education, to developprofessionally, and to participate in civic life. As a consequence, a first-yearcourse in written English, along with basic writing and ESL courses that pointstudents toward fluency in written and spoken English, seems not only to makesense but to be inevitable in the design of writing programs and curriculum.The purpose of this essay is to raise some questions about this familiarstate of affairs. We argue that a tacit language policy of unidirectional Englishmonolingualism has shaped the historical formation of U.S. writing instruc-tion and continues to influence its theory and practice in shadowy, largelyCCC 53:4 / JUNE 2002594This content downloaded from 128.95.104.109 on Mon, 22 Apr 2019 02:31:58 UTCAll use subject to
HORNER &TRIMBUR / ENGLISH ONLY AND COLLEGE COMPOSITIONunexamined ways. We are aware that for many writingtion of language policy is likely to call up images of Endebates about Ebonics, and the phonics wars-issues to tvoting, lobbying, and calling on our professional associaters of influence in public forums. To say the first-yearembodies a language policy that privileges English in rela

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