BI211 Postlab 6 - BI211 Human Physiology Fall ...

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Unformatted text preview: BI211: Human Physiology Fall 2012 Quiz Total* Post- lab Section: D1 Lab 6 Skeletal Muscle Just type in your names below Partner 1 Name: Katie Kenney ______ /10 ______ /10 Partner 2 Name: Thaddeus Babiec ______ /10 ______ /10 ______ /10 ______ /10 Partner 3 Name: Table 1 Table 1: EMG and Muscle Force 1st 2nd EMG 0.043 0.043 Muscle 2.065 4.429 3rd 0.116 7.636 4th 0.136 9.799 Figure 1 Table 2 Table 2: Group data of wrist postion 90 0 EMG 0.075 0.096 Muscle 7.778 8.79 -90 0.116 7.77 BI211: Human Physiology Fall 2012 Figure 2 EMG by Contractions 0.16 0.14 EMG 0.12 0.1 0.08 0.06 EMG by Contractions 0.04 0.02 0 1st 2nd 3rd 4th Contraction number Figure 3 Contraction strength (kg) Muscle Contraction vs. Contraction Number 12 10 8 6 Muscle Contraction vs. Contraction Number 4 2 0 1st 2nd 3rd 4th Contraction number Table 3a Table 3: Class Data of Wrist Position--EMG 0 -90 90 Group 1 0.014 0.062 0.026 Group 2 0.905 0.318 0.783 Group 3 0.339 0.234 0.331 Group 4 0.255 0.246 0.212 Group 5 0.075 0.096 0.116 Group 6 0.629 0.466 0.211 Group 7 0.316 0.173 0.119 Group 8 0.582 0.665 0.105 BI211: Human Physiology Group 9 Fall 2012 0.785 0.339 0.073 Group 10 0.13 0.037 0.078 Group 11 1.306 0.584 0.748 Group 12 0.248 0.114 0.152 Average 0.465333333 0.277833333 0.246166667 Standard Error 0.111493194 0.059212743 0.073766506 90 vs 0 90 vs -90 0 vs -90 0.078028546 0.058756215 0.370557937 t-test Table 3b Table 3: Class Data of Wrist Position--Muscle force 0 -90 90 Group 1 7.239 8.979 6.346 Group 2 9.885 12.21 10.898 Group 3 2.913 3.265 3.528 Group 4 1.381 2.341 1.934 Group 5 7.778 8.79 7.77 Group 6 4.332 5.337 2.279 Group 7 7.169 24.73 26.163 Group 8 0.536 2.606 1.932 Group 9 0.027 0.037 0.031 Group 10 2.069 4.372 3.825 Group 11 5.342 9.61 6.234 Group 12 2.703 3.358 2.376 Average 4.281166667 7.13625 6.109666667 Standard Error 0.919644396 1.910081111 2.023031386 90 vs 0 90 vs -90 0 vs -90 0.098503887 0.211602175 0.357843551 t-test BI211: Human Physiology Fall 2012 Figure 4 Table 4 Table 4: EMG and effect of temperature cold warm room Latency 0.122 0.055 0.089 Muscle 8.869 9.228 9.799 Figure 5 Wrist Angle vs. EMG Absolute Area EMG 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 Wrist Angle vs. EMG 0.2 0.1 0 90 0 - 90 Wrist Angle BI211: Human Physiology Fall 2012 Figure 6 Wrist Angle vs. Muscle Strength Strength (kg) 10 8 6 Wrist Angle vs. Muscle Strength 4 2 0 90 0 - 90 Wrist Angle Figure 7 Table 5 Table 5: Force as an effect of fatigue circumference max force 31cm 25 BI211: Human Physiology 1/2 max force 1/2 max time Fall 2012 12.5 27.558 Figure 8 1.1 As the absolute area under the EMG signals increases, the strength of the muscle contraction also increases. The absolute area represents the electrical activity during a contraction, so if there is greater activity and more action potentials, the contraction will also be larger. The relationship would be similar for both arms because they both have the same muscle anatomy so the muscles will respond similarly to the same stimulus. Both arms will have similar strengths because they are, for the most part, used equally. 1.2 It is a combination of the two. If the EMG remains the same in terms of stimulus nut is sustained, this is to say, the same contraction is sustained longer, then it’s the same finite number of muscle units firing more often. When the strength of the contraction increases, more fibers are recruited it increase the force being produced. 1.3 Error bars and t- tests were not necessary because this part of the lab did not involve class data. Only group data was used to make the graphs in this section, and we were not asked to compare or find significant differences between any parts of the data collected. 3.1 According to the t- tests, none of the tests were significantly different. This could be because it was class data and some of the data was off what would have been expected values. We were expecting to see some significant differences between the wrist angles at 90 when compared to straight. 3.2 A larger EMG was needed when the wrist was at an angle to create a strong muscle contraction when compared to the EMG when the wrist was straight. BI211: Human Physiology Fall 2012 4.1 When the muscles were cooled off, the latency period increased a lot. When the muscles were warm, the latency period was shorter than at room temperature. 4.2 The temperature had a small effect on the muscle force, decreasing it at the lower temperature. 4.3 Latency was more affected by temperature. This makes sense because the decrease in temperature slows down molecular movement so it would take longer for ions to move around from cell to cell. The strength will be affected but not as much because once the sarcomeres start moving, the strength and movement provided by each doesn’t change, regardless of temp. 5.1 A larger forearm could suggest that the subject has more muscle, which means that there are more muscle fibers to be activated and contracted. This would generate a greater maximum force. 5.2 The temperature of the muscles would be factor due to the slowed ion movement if the temp was cold. Also if the arm contained fast twitch or slow twitch muscles. If the arm was fast twitch muscle, the muscle would fatigue much more quickly when compared to an individual with slow twitch muscle which has a higher endurance compared to fast twitch. ...
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